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Fashion Designer fashions – sketches & fashion shows blog.

Exhibit: ‘Paul Poiret, King of Fashion’

Exhibition is on show at the Moscow Kremlin Museum. He was one of the most influential designers of haute couture at the dawn of its existence and the man who took fashion from the 19th century to the modern era. To mark 100 years since Paul Poiret’s visit to Russia, the Moscow Kremlin Museums is to open a vast retrospective display of the French couturier’s works. The future revolutionary of fashion, Paul Poiret, the son of a humble shop-keeper, started his career as a modeler in the fashion houses of haute couture gurus of the time – Jacques Doucet and Worth. But his models proved to be too radical for the clientele of the established designers. He opened his own Fashion House in Paris in 1903 and gained immense popularity almost overnight. Women were happy to adopt a more relaxed and creative attitude towards their clothing  – something that had been unthinkable just a few decades earlier. He liberated women from the rigid corseting and petticoats which had imprisoned them for decades and this new freedom of attire came to reflect the social processes which saw women becoming more independent and liberated.   -- read more on this story by Elena Monakhova, RTExhibition is on show at the Moscow Kremlin Museum. He was one of the most influential designers of haute couture at the dawn of its existence and the man who took fashion from the 19th century to the modern era. To mark 100 years since Paul Poiret’s visit to Russia, the Moscow Kremlin Museums is to open a vast retrospective display of the French couturier’s works. The future revolutionary of fashion, Paul Poiret, the son of a humble shop-keeper, started his career as a modeler in the fashion houses of haute couture gurus of the time – Jacques Doucet and Worth. But his models proved to be too radical for the clientele of the established designers. He opened his own Fashion House in Paris in 1903 and gained immense popularity almost overnight. Women were happy to adopt a more relaxed and creative attitude towards their clothing  – something that had been unthinkable just a few decades earlier. He liberated women from the rigid corseting and petticoats which had imprisoned them for decades and this new freedom of attire came to reflect the social processes which saw women becoming more independent and liberated.   — read more on this story by Elena Monakhova, RT

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