RTWear-You-Out

Fashion Designer fashions – sketches & fashion shows blog.


Fashion watercolors by Moa Bartling

Moa Bartling is a Swedish illustrator and print designer. She graduated in 2002 from Beckmans School of Design (Stockholm). Beautiful watercolors, food and fashion sketches, with a happy colorful style. Represented by Agent Molly & Co (Europe) and Snyder and the Swedes (USA).  fr

Moa Bartling is a Swedish illustrator and print designer. She graduated in 2002 from Beckmans School of Design (Stockholm). Beautiful watercolors, food and fashion sketches, with a happy colorful style. Represented by Agent Molly & Co (Europe) and Snyder and the Swedes (USA).

fr Original Source | Partfaliaz.com

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Inside the Dreamboat Factory

The Fairy Godfather of Hollywood "He won't be gay when I get through with him!" The Fairy Godfather of Hollywood.
“He won’t be gay when I get through with him!”

His business card read: “If you’re interested in getting into the movies, I can help you. Henry Wilson. Agent.” And he could. Most famously, he took the gangly young Roy Scherer, got his teeth fixed, dubbed him “Rock Hudson,” and used his clout to provoke a major studio build-up for the ex-mailman from Winnetka, Illinois. He steered actresses through Hollywood’s career hoops too, like Lana Turner, Rhonda Fleming, and Gena Rowlands, but Wilson earned his sobriquet of “fairy godfather of Hollywood” through his single-minded focus on newly arrived young hunks on the Sunset Strip, with whispered enticements like, “You could be a star…. You’re better looking than any movie actor here.” Moving closer, to advance the intimacy, he would confide: “You are a star. Now it’s up to me to let Hollywood know.” What red-blooded college quarterback or figure skater or sailor on leave could resist such a pitch?       Story Written by | Robert Keser.

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Nitty-gritty of designing for the Coens

Joel and Ethan Coen claim they never saw the first “True Grit,” helmed by Henry Hathaway and released in 1969, earning John Wayne his only Oscar.

At least, that’s what they told production designer Jess Gonchor and costume designer Mary Zophres, advising them not to bother with the earlier film, but to focus instead on the Charles Portis novel on which they based their script.

He followed the advice, although he admits he later snuck in some YouTube viewings of parts of the first film. Zophres also took her cues mainly from the book, which she read three times before reading the Coens’ script.

The Coens are more interested in creating their own mythology than in doing remakes or producing pictures that fit the mold of traditional Hollywood fare.

Read More | Variety